Eels winger Blake Ferguson

It was the winger's trick play that got lost in Parramatta's 24-12 win over the Sharks on Saturday night, which could spark a forgotten rule in the playbook becoming a lot more common.

In-form Eels recruit Blake Ferguson came up with the rare moment, when he put one foot on the sideline to bat a ball into touch following an accurate Sharks kick inside the 10-metre zone.

Cronulla looked to have been the beneficiaries of an accurate Chad Townsend kick pulling up next to the sideline but Ferguson was quick to remind match officials of the rules and the Eels were awarded the scrum feed.

The play left commentators and viewers slightly confused and divided, while Eels coach Brad Arthur insisted he hadn't learned it under his watch.

"He's been trying to tell our boys about that at training, he's too smart isn't he?" Arthur quipped.

"At the time I wasn't real happy but he knows the rules, he knows the game well. He's told the boys about that and practises at training.

"It's not a fluke. He actually does do it at training."

Parramatta Eels playmaker Mitchell Moses wasn't aware of the rule at all and assumed the side would be forced to defend their line instead.

"Since coming to the club I had no idea how smart he was as a footballer, I just thought he was about taking hit up after hit up," Moses said of Ferguson.

"What he's brought to the team is unbelievable. He's helping everyone out. He's always positive, brings good energy for us and good vibes."

Moses has been an early winner from Ferguson's arrival at the Eels, along with the other Eels' back-five go-forward, allowing the former Tigers pivot to play on the front foot.

Eels halfback Mitch Moses.
Eels halfback Mitch Moses. ©Nathan Hopkins/NRL Photos

Between them, the Eels outside backs totalled 930 of the side's 1,909 metres to take heat off the halves and engine room.

While Moses was happy to praise his teammates' form, he wasn't as committed talking about his own performance in an otherwise solid opening 3-1 record to start the season.

"I always knew I had this footy in me but it's about me doing it for 25 rounds," Moses said.

"I felt good but it was the platform the boys were laying for me. It allowed me to run the footy and take control of what the back five and forwards laid for me.

"It's only the start and I've got to keep my head down. If the boys are doing that week in week out it's going to make my job a lot easier. There's a good feeling around the club at the moment."